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  1. Quote post

    2. BEAR

    A mondegreen is a misinterpreted song title or lyric. An example is the mishearing of a certain hymn title as “Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear.” The verb bear, meaning “to carry, endure or give birth to,” comes from Old English beran, of Germanic origin, from the Indo-European root bher-. The name of the big, hairy lumbering mammal comes from Old English bera, “bear,” from Germanic *berō, meaning “the brown animal,” “bear.”

    — 11 Doppelganger Words: The Resemblance is Eerie via MentalFloss

  2. Link post

    Classic books that have been subjected to some unfortunate covers…

    Notes: 1 note

    Tags: lit reading book covers

  3. Link post

    A little Shakespeare heavy, but man is this one hilarious list. Tumblr is just about the most creative place on the internet. 

  4. Link post

    Great profile of a fascinating writer!

    via The Guardian

  5. Link post

    via Goodreads, 20 intersections between history and literature

  6. Quote post

    People say the best revenge is living well. I say it’s acid in the face. Who will love them now?

    — 

    Mindy Kaling, Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) 

    2 minutes in and this is already the funniest book I’ve read this year. 

  7. Photo post

    incidentalcomics:

The Writers’ Retreat
For the July 20 NY Times Book Review. Thanks to AD Nicholas Blechman and editor Pamela Paul!

    incidentalcomics:

    The Writers’ Retreat

    For the July 20 NY Times Book Review. Thanks to AD Nicholas Blechman and editor Pamela Paul!

    Notes: 4,661 notes

    Reblogged from: amandaonwriting

    Tags: writing writer

  8. Photo post

    So amused by the Emma Watson shout out in the new JK Rowling/Robert Galbraith mystery

    So amused by the Emma Watson shout out in the new JK Rowling/Robert Galbraith mystery

  9. Notes: 1,359 notes

    Reblogged from: amandaonwriting

    Tags: words

  10. Quote post

    2. “FROM A GENTLEMAN TO A YOUNG LADY OF SUPERIOR FORTUNE”

    This one opens with a similar overstatement of flattery sprinkled with unworthiness. But the highlight comes when this gentleman concedes to his would-be sugar momma that:

    Were our circumstances reversed, I should hardly take to myself the credit of doing a generous action, in overlooking the consideration of wealth, and making you an unreserved tender of my hand and fortune.

    At least he’s honest.

    In her reply, she scolds him for assuming a lady’s heart will be swayed or stayed by disparity of fortune, but demurs that any decision on the matter should be left up to her father.

    4. “FROM A WIDOW TO A YOUNG GENTLEMAN, REJECTING HIS SUIT”

    You are, by your account, two and twenty. I am, by mine, six and forty; you are too young to know the duties of a father. I have a son who is seventeen, and consequently too old to learn the duties of a son from one so little senior to himself.

    This sounds like reasonable grounds for rejection—or for a sitcom plot—but our widow is savvy enough to question the motives of a 22-year-old looking to shack up with someone more than double his age.

    [W]hen you can convince me that in point of age, fortune, and morals, you are such a person as I can, without reproach, rake for a husband, and admit as a guardian to my children, I shall cease to think, as I now candidly confess I do, that motives far from honourable, or disinterested love, have influence your application.

    Those implied motives: gold-digging.

    — 7 Highlights from a 19th Century Book of Sample Love Letters via Mental Floss

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